Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul and Mary, Thursday, January 22

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A Discussion with folk icon Peter Yarrow
Thursday, January 22, 2014
6
:15-7:45PM
ADVANCE RSVP REQUIRED          

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On Thursday, January 22 we are thrilled to have iconic singer/songwriter and political activist, Peter Yarrow, join us for a discussion of recently released book, Peter Paul and Mary: Fifty Years in Music and Life.
The book chronicles the intimate story of Peter, Paul, and Mary and their music, through their own words and with iconic images that follow their passionate, fifty-year journey to the center of America’s heart.

Order your copy of Peter Paul and Mary: Fifty Years in Music Life in advance and get it signed at our event.MORE DETAILS ON THIS EVENT TO COME

ABOUT PETER YARROW
As a successful artist and activist, Peter Yarrow’s talent is legendary. His gift for songwriting has produced some of the most moving songs Peter, Paul & Mary have recorded, including Puff, The Magic Dragon, Day Is Done, The Great Mandala and Light One Candle. His musical creativity has always gone hand in hand with his commitment to social justice and equity in society. And today, he’s reaching a whole new generation with his music and advocacy.
Yarrow has been on the front lines ever since the Civil Rights Movement of the early 1960s. Over the years, many issues have moved Peter to commit his time and talent: equal rights, peace, the environment, gender equality, homelessness, hospice care and education. All have utilized his skills as both a performer and an organizer. Along with his singing partners, Noel “Paul” Stookey and Mary Travers, Peter participated in the Civil Rights Movement, which brought them to Washington in 1963 to sing for the historic march led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as the equally historic Selma-Montgomery march in 1965. He went on to produce and coordinate numerous events for the Peace/anti-Vietnam War movement, including festivals at Madison Square Garden and Shea Stadium. These efforts culminated in his co-organizing the 1969 Celebration of Life, the famous march on Washington, in which some half-million people participated.
Yarrow’s most recent efforts are focused on a non-profit he founded in 1999 called Operation Respect, which disseminates a free program utilizing music and video along with curricular materials designed to establish a safe, compassionate and nurturing environment in schools and summer camps across America. Operation Respect’s classroom-based program, “Don’t Laugh At Me” (DLAM) is available free to teachers, parents and all educational advocates through the generosity of the McGraw-Hill companies via http://www.operationrespect.org. Now utilized in over 20,000 schools in the US and internationally, DLAM has been hailed by the educational community as a key response to the challenge of bullying and the many forms of physical and emotional violence among children and youth.
Peter believes that meaningful shifts in educational policy and practice could play a decisive role in preventing the next generation from repeating the cycle of bias, discrimination, fear and hate of the “other”, the root causes of war and international conflict. Seen in these terms, the work of Operation Respect goes far beyond a children’s anti-bullying and violence prevention effort. It is, in essence, a peace-seeking initiative that continues and culminates Peter’s nearly 50 years of activism and organizing. Some of his other recent work involves advocacy and fund-raising for Mercy Corps.
Peter continues to lobby with policymakers across the political spectrum on behalf of children and education. He is convinced that the programs like Operation Respect, and strong music and art programs in general, are needed to educate the whole child. “More singing and creative activity among children creates greater building blocks for education and preparation for citizenship in a democracy,” he says.
Peter Yarrow’s life and work, culminating in the founding and leadership of Operation Respect, embraces the premise that if each person finds a way to articulate his or her own voice and joins with others, together they can become a powerful force for the transformation of society.

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