Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger on China

Henry Kissinger

Due to overwhelming response, our lunch with Dr. Kissinger is now SOLD OUT.

If you have not purchased your ticket in advance, please phone our office at 212-599-7040 by Friday, September 30th at 12:00 pm to see if you have a confirmed seat.

Join The Common Good for a luncheon with Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger as he discusses his latest book “On China.”

As China emerges as an economic juggernaut and competes increasingly with the United States for world resources, market share and international influence, we need to better understand this country and the new realities.

Dr. Kissinger will discuss China, a country he has known intimately for decades, and whose modern relations with the West he helped shape.

Dr. Kissinger’s book, “On China,” will be available for purchase at the event.

RSVP at rsvp@thecommongood.net or phone 212-599-7040. If you are interested in sponsorship of The Common Good and becoming a part of our exciting events and initiatives, visit our website http://www.thecommongood.net/1473-2/ or send an e-mail to info@thecommongood.net.

 

SPEAKER NOTES:
REVIEWS: “ON CHINA
Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s new book, “On China,” draws on historical records as well as his conversations with Chinese leaders over the past 40 years to examine how China has approached diplomacy, strategy, and negotiation throughout its history, and reflects on the consequences for the global balance of power in the 21st century.

The Guardian by Rana Mitter
“Henry Kissinger will always remain a controversial historical figure. But this elegantly written and erudite book reminds us that on one of the biggest questions of the post-second world war world his judgment was right, and showed a long-term vision that few politicians of any country could match today. Unless, of course, Hillary Clinton is even now on a secret mission to Tehran.”

New York Times by Max Frankel
“To the degree that Washington and Beijing now understand each other, it is in good measure because Kissinger has been assiduously translating for both sides, discerning meaning in everything from elliptical jokes to temper tantrums. At every juncture, he has been striving to find “strategic concepts” that could be made to prevail over a history of conflict, mutual grievance and fear. As President Nixon’s national security adviser, then secretary of state for Nixon and Gerald Ford, and since 1977 as a private interlocutor extraordinaire, Kissinger has been unwaveringly committed to surmounting what he considers the legitimate Chinese resentment of American interference in their internal affairs and Americans’ distaste for China’s brutal suppression of ethnic, religious and political dissent. The surprise buried in his lumbering review of Sino-American relations is that the much ballyhooed Nixon-Kissinger journeys to China in 1971-72 turned out to have been the easy part.”

Wall Street Journal by Brett Stephens
“Nobody living can claim greater credit than Mr. Kissinger for America’s 1971 opening to Beijing, after more than two decades of estrangement, and for China’s subsequent opening to the world. So it’s fitting that Mr. Kissinger has now written “On China,” a fluent, fascinating and sometimes infuriating book that is part history, part memoir and above all an examination of the premises, methods and aims of Chinese foreign policy.”

ABOUT OUR SPEAKER:
Henry Alfred Kissinger was sworn in on September 22, 1973, as the 56th Secretary of State, a position he held until January 20, 1977. He also served as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs from January 20, 1969, until November 3, 1975. In July 1983 he was appointed by President Reagan to chair the National Bipartisan Commission on Central America until it ceased operation in January 1985, and from 1984-1990 he served as a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board. From 1986-1988 he was a member of the Commission on Integrated Long-Term Strategy of the National Security Council and Defense Department. He is currently a member of the Defense Policy Board.
Among the awards Dr. Kissinger has received have been the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973; the Presidential Medal of Freedom (the nation’s highest civilian award) in 1977; and the Medal of Liberty (given one time to ten foreign-born American leaders) in 1986.

Dr. Kissinger was born in Fuerth, Germany, came to the United States in 1938 and was naturalized a United States citizen in 1943. He served in the Army from 1943 to 1946. He graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1950 and received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1952 and 1954.

From 1954 until 1969 he was a member of the faculty of Harvard University, in both the Department of Government and the Center for International Affairs. He was Director of the Harvard International Seminar from 1952 to 1969.

For more information about Henry Kissinger, visit our speaker page here.

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